Kindred
by Bonnie & Lauren




Bonnie & Lauren are kindred spirits. This blog is a collection of current projects, favorite photos, and mad love.

Check out our portfolio (there's a link up top). We'd love to meet you. You can email us!
Emily & Henry, 1/3………………………..

The night I met Emily and Henry, I was nursing a Hunger Games hangover. 
I’d just read the series for the first time at record speed. One night on the subway I ended up at 125th street when I meant to get off at 59th because Katniss had just been stung by mutated wasps. I told Emily that to Quell the Hunger (double reference!), I watched the movies and was contemplating reading the series again. She works in publishing, so she understood. We laughed. It was a slightly embarrassing way to make a first impression, but soon we became engrossed in her wedding plans with Henry. She whispered about her pink dress so that he wouldn’t hear, and they sat close all night. It was obvious that their love for each other was true and tender. Lauren and I left excited for March 22.Later that evening, Emily sent a follow-up email listing thirteen young adult dystopian novels that I should read. It was a small gesture, but it was so thoughtful.
The night of their wedding, her sister’s toast included a bit about how thoughtful and generous Emily is. It struck me because even though I haven’t known them long, I knew it to be true. And I can see it in both of them. I saw it in the way they treated their families and friends. Their wedding was beautiful and unique and communal and so very generous. I’m looking forward to seeing how their lives unfold together. 

— B
Emily & Henry, 1/3………………………..

The night I met Emily and Henry, I was nursing a Hunger Games hangover. 
I’d just read the series for the first time at record speed. One night on the subway I ended up at 125th street when I meant to get off at 59th because Katniss had just been stung by mutated wasps. I told Emily that to Quell the Hunger (double reference!), I watched the movies and was contemplating reading the series again. She works in publishing, so she understood. We laughed. It was a slightly embarrassing way to make a first impression, but soon we became engrossed in her wedding plans with Henry. She whispered about her pink dress so that he wouldn’t hear, and they sat close all night. It was obvious that their love for each other was true and tender. Lauren and I left excited for March 22.Later that evening, Emily sent a follow-up email listing thirteen young adult dystopian novels that I should read. It was a small gesture, but it was so thoughtful.
The night of their wedding, her sister’s toast included a bit about how thoughtful and generous Emily is. It struck me because even though I haven’t known them long, I knew it to be true. And I can see it in both of them. I saw it in the way they treated their families and friends. Their wedding was beautiful and unique and communal and so very generous. I’m looking forward to seeing how their lives unfold together. 

— B
Emily & Henry, 1/3………………………..

The night I met Emily and Henry, I was nursing a Hunger Games hangover. 
I’d just read the series for the first time at record speed. One night on the subway I ended up at 125th street when I meant to get off at 59th because Katniss had just been stung by mutated wasps. I told Emily that to Quell the Hunger (double reference!), I watched the movies and was contemplating reading the series again. She works in publishing, so she understood. We laughed. It was a slightly embarrassing way to make a first impression, but soon we became engrossed in her wedding plans with Henry. She whispered about her pink dress so that he wouldn’t hear, and they sat close all night. It was obvious that their love for each other was true and tender. Lauren and I left excited for March 22.Later that evening, Emily sent a follow-up email listing thirteen young adult dystopian novels that I should read. It was a small gesture, but it was so thoughtful.
The night of their wedding, her sister’s toast included a bit about how thoughtful and generous Emily is. It struck me because even though I haven’t known them long, I knew it to be true. And I can see it in both of them. I saw it in the way they treated their families and friends. Their wedding was beautiful and unique and communal and so very generous. I’m looking forward to seeing how their lives unfold together. 

— B
Emily & Henry, 1/3………………………..

The night I met Emily and Henry, I was nursing a Hunger Games hangover. 
I’d just read the series for the first time at record speed. One night on the subway I ended up at 125th street when I meant to get off at 59th because Katniss had just been stung by mutated wasps. I told Emily that to Quell the Hunger (double reference!), I watched the movies and was contemplating reading the series again. She works in publishing, so she understood. We laughed. It was a slightly embarrassing way to make a first impression, but soon we became engrossed in her wedding plans with Henry. She whispered about her pink dress so that he wouldn’t hear, and they sat close all night. It was obvious that their love for each other was true and tender. Lauren and I left excited for March 22.Later that evening, Emily sent a follow-up email listing thirteen young adult dystopian novels that I should read. It was a small gesture, but it was so thoughtful.
The night of their wedding, her sister’s toast included a bit about how thoughtful and generous Emily is. It struck me because even though I haven’t known them long, I knew it to be true. And I can see it in both of them. I saw it in the way they treated their families and friends. Their wedding was beautiful and unique and communal and so very generous. I’m looking forward to seeing how their lives unfold together. 

— B
Emily & Henry, 1/3………………………..

The night I met Emily and Henry, I was nursing a Hunger Games hangover. 
I’d just read the series for the first time at record speed. One night on the subway I ended up at 125th street when I meant to get off at 59th because Katniss had just been stung by mutated wasps. I told Emily that to Quell the Hunger (double reference!), I watched the movies and was contemplating reading the series again. She works in publishing, so she understood. We laughed. It was a slightly embarrassing way to make a first impression, but soon we became engrossed in her wedding plans with Henry. She whispered about her pink dress so that he wouldn’t hear, and they sat close all night. It was obvious that their love for each other was true and tender. Lauren and I left excited for March 22.Later that evening, Emily sent a follow-up email listing thirteen young adult dystopian novels that I should read. It was a small gesture, but it was so thoughtful.
The night of their wedding, her sister’s toast included a bit about how thoughtful and generous Emily is. It struck me because even though I haven’t known them long, I knew it to be true. And I can see it in both of them. I saw it in the way they treated their families and friends. Their wedding was beautiful and unique and communal and so very generous. I’m looking forward to seeing how their lives unfold together. 

— B
Emily & Henry, 1/3………………………..

The night I met Emily and Henry, I was nursing a Hunger Games hangover. 
I’d just read the series for the first time at record speed. One night on the subway I ended up at 125th street when I meant to get off at 59th because Katniss had just been stung by mutated wasps. I told Emily that to Quell the Hunger (double reference!), I watched the movies and was contemplating reading the series again. She works in publishing, so she understood. We laughed. It was a slightly embarrassing way to make a first impression, but soon we became engrossed in her wedding plans with Henry. She whispered about her pink dress so that he wouldn’t hear, and they sat close all night. It was obvious that their love for each other was true and tender. Lauren and I left excited for March 22.Later that evening, Emily sent a follow-up email listing thirteen young adult dystopian novels that I should read. It was a small gesture, but it was so thoughtful.
The night of their wedding, her sister’s toast included a bit about how thoughtful and generous Emily is. It struck me because even though I haven’t known them long, I knew it to be true. And I can see it in both of them. I saw it in the way they treated their families and friends. Their wedding was beautiful and unique and communal and so very generous. I’m looking forward to seeing how their lives unfold together. 

— B
Emily & Henry, 1/3………………………..

The night I met Emily and Henry, I was nursing a Hunger Games hangover. 
I’d just read the series for the first time at record speed. One night on the subway I ended up at 125th street when I meant to get off at 59th because Katniss had just been stung by mutated wasps. I told Emily that to Quell the Hunger (double reference!), I watched the movies and was contemplating reading the series again. She works in publishing, so she understood. We laughed. It was a slightly embarrassing way to make a first impression, but soon we became engrossed in her wedding plans with Henry. She whispered about her pink dress so that he wouldn’t hear, and they sat close all night. It was obvious that their love for each other was true and tender. Lauren and I left excited for March 22.Later that evening, Emily sent a follow-up email listing thirteen young adult dystopian novels that I should read. It was a small gesture, but it was so thoughtful.
The night of their wedding, her sister’s toast included a bit about how thoughtful and generous Emily is. It struck me because even though I haven’t known them long, I knew it to be true. And I can see it in both of them. I saw it in the way they treated their families and friends. Their wedding was beautiful and unique and communal and so very generous. I’m looking forward to seeing how their lives unfold together. 

— B
Emily & Henry, 1/3………………………..

The night I met Emily and Henry, I was nursing a Hunger Games hangover. 
I’d just read the series for the first time at record speed. One night on the subway I ended up at 125th street when I meant to get off at 59th because Katniss had just been stung by mutated wasps. I told Emily that to Quell the Hunger (double reference!), I watched the movies and was contemplating reading the series again. She works in publishing, so she understood. We laughed. It was a slightly embarrassing way to make a first impression, but soon we became engrossed in her wedding plans with Henry. She whispered about her pink dress so that he wouldn’t hear, and they sat close all night. It was obvious that their love for each other was true and tender. Lauren and I left excited for March 22.Later that evening, Emily sent a follow-up email listing thirteen young adult dystopian novels that I should read. It was a small gesture, but it was so thoughtful.
The night of their wedding, her sister’s toast included a bit about how thoughtful and generous Emily is. It struck me because even though I haven’t known them long, I knew it to be true. And I can see it in both of them. I saw it in the way they treated their families and friends. Their wedding was beautiful and unique and communal and so very generous. I’m looking forward to seeing how their lives unfold together. 

— B
Emily & Henry, 1/3………………………..

The night I met Emily and Henry, I was nursing a Hunger Games hangover. 
I’d just read the series for the first time at record speed. One night on the subway I ended up at 125th street when I meant to get off at 59th because Katniss had just been stung by mutated wasps. I told Emily that to Quell the Hunger (double reference!), I watched the movies and was contemplating reading the series again. She works in publishing, so she understood. We laughed. It was a slightly embarrassing way to make a first impression, but soon we became engrossed in her wedding plans with Henry. She whispered about her pink dress so that he wouldn’t hear, and they sat close all night. It was obvious that their love for each other was true and tender. Lauren and I left excited for March 22.Later that evening, Emily sent a follow-up email listing thirteen young adult dystopian novels that I should read. It was a small gesture, but it was so thoughtful.
The night of their wedding, her sister’s toast included a bit about how thoughtful and generous Emily is. It struck me because even though I haven’t known them long, I knew it to be true. And I can see it in both of them. I saw it in the way they treated their families and friends. Their wedding was beautiful and unique and communal and so very generous. I’m looking forward to seeing how their lives unfold together. 

— B
Emily & Henry, 1/3………………………..

The night I met Emily and Henry, I was nursing a Hunger Games hangover. 
I’d just read the series for the first time at record speed. One night on the subway I ended up at 125th street when I meant to get off at 59th because Katniss had just been stung by mutated wasps. I told Emily that to Quell the Hunger (double reference!), I watched the movies and was contemplating reading the series again. She works in publishing, so she understood. We laughed. It was a slightly embarrassing way to make a first impression, but soon we became engrossed in her wedding plans with Henry. She whispered about her pink dress so that he wouldn’t hear, and they sat close all night. It was obvious that their love for each other was true and tender. Lauren and I left excited for March 22.Later that evening, Emily sent a follow-up email listing thirteen young adult dystopian novels that I should read. It was a small gesture, but it was so thoughtful.
The night of their wedding, her sister’s toast included a bit about how thoughtful and generous Emily is. It struck me because even though I haven’t known them long, I knew it to be true. And I can see it in both of them. I saw it in the way they treated their families and friends. Their wedding was beautiful and unique and communal and so very generous. I’m looking forward to seeing how their lives unfold together. 

— B

Emily & Henry, 1/3
………………………..

The night I met Emily and Henry, I was nursing a Hunger Games hangover. 

I’d just read the series for the first time at record speed. One night on the subway I ended up at 125th street when I meant to get off at 59th because Katniss had just been stung by mutated wasps. I told Emily that to Quell the Hunger (double reference!), I watched the movies and was contemplating reading the series again. She works in publishing, so she understood. We laughed. It was a slightly embarrassing way to make a first impression, but soon we became engrossed in her wedding plans with Henry. She whispered about her pink dress so that he wouldn’t hear, and they sat close all night. It was obvious that their love for each other was true and tender. Lauren and I left excited for March 22.

Later that evening, Emily sent a follow-up email listing thirteen young adult dystopian novels that I should read. It was a small gesture, but it was so thoughtful.

The night of their wedding, her sister’s toast included a bit about how thoughtful and generous Emily is. It struck me because even though I haven’t known them long, I knew it to be true. And I can see it in both of them. I saw it in the way they treated their families and friends. Their wedding was beautiful and unique and communal and so very generous. I’m looking forward to seeing how their lives unfold together. 
— B

SXSW is a beautifully cacaphonous scene and hard to navigate, so I was lucky to have the direction of shooting part of KEXP’s showcase at Mellow Johnny’s Bike Shop in Austin.

Hurray for the Riff Raff is awesome. I love modern folk musicians who are able to respect the traditions of a genre while bringing in their own unique sound.

Please check them out and I also recommend reading this interview Alynda did with NPR.

-L

These two men fish in the river that flows through Pai in northern Thailand. They wade up the river and throw their nets in this Spider-Man kinda way. I watched them fish each morning for five days, my legs swinging from the rickety bamboo bridge that crossed the river. I never thought they noticed me, but as I walked over the bridge on the fifth day with my hiker’s pack to head to the next town, one of them stopped, looked up at me with a smile, and then cast his net up the river for a catch.
-B
These two men fish in the river that flows through Pai in northern Thailand. They wade up the river and throw their nets in this Spider-Man kinda way. I watched them fish each morning for five days, my legs swinging from the rickety bamboo bridge that crossed the river. I never thought they noticed me, but as I walked over the bridge on the fifth day with my hiker’s pack to head to the next town, one of them stopped, looked up at me with a smile, and then cast his net up the river for a catch.
-B

These two men fish in the river that flows through Pai in northern Thailand. They wade up the river and throw their nets in this Spider-Man kinda way. I watched them fish each morning for five days, my legs swinging from the rickety bamboo bridge that crossed the river. I never thought they noticed me, but as I walked over the bridge on the fifth day with my hiker’s pack to head to the next town, one of them stopped, looked up at me with a smile, and then cast his net up the river for a catch.

-B

It feels like a dream. Naomi and Rich flew me to Australia to photograph their wedding in their beloved hometown. They showed me the beaches where they skipped rocks as kids, a night sky of constellations I didn’t even know existed, a new way to speak English, and most beautifully, the way they loved their families.
It’s an awesome gift to be invited into a new world.
These photos are a small glimpse into their story.
—L 
It feels like a dream. Naomi and Rich flew me to Australia to photograph their wedding in their beloved hometown. They showed me the beaches where they skipped rocks as kids, a night sky of constellations I didn’t even know existed, a new way to speak English, and most beautifully, the way they loved their families.
It’s an awesome gift to be invited into a new world.
These photos are a small glimpse into their story.
—L 
It feels like a dream. Naomi and Rich flew me to Australia to photograph their wedding in their beloved hometown. They showed me the beaches where they skipped rocks as kids, a night sky of constellations I didn’t even know existed, a new way to speak English, and most beautifully, the way they loved their families.
It’s an awesome gift to be invited into a new world.
These photos are a small glimpse into their story.
—L 
It feels like a dream. Naomi and Rich flew me to Australia to photograph their wedding in their beloved hometown. They showed me the beaches where they skipped rocks as kids, a night sky of constellations I didn’t even know existed, a new way to speak English, and most beautifully, the way they loved their families.
It’s an awesome gift to be invited into a new world.
These photos are a small glimpse into their story.
—L 
It feels like a dream. Naomi and Rich flew me to Australia to photograph their wedding in their beloved hometown. They showed me the beaches where they skipped rocks as kids, a night sky of constellations I didn’t even know existed, a new way to speak English, and most beautifully, the way they loved their families.
It’s an awesome gift to be invited into a new world.
These photos are a small glimpse into their story.
—L 

It feels like a dream. Naomi and Rich flew me to Australia to photograph their wedding in their beloved hometown. They showed me the beaches where they skipped rocks as kids, a night sky of constellations I didn’t even know existed, a new way to speak English, and most beautifully, the way they loved their families.

It’s an awesome gift to be invited into a new world.

These photos are a small glimpse into their story.

—L 

Postcard from India //

Travel makes me feel like a separate, parallel person. Same shell, but with the insides emptied out and slowly re-filling. Past experiences lead me to react the way I do but are little help in understanding what’s happening around me. There’s so much to learn about the world and my ignorance humbles me beyond belief.

-L

Today I leave Chiangmai for Pai. This is my first time traveling alone for more than a few days in a foreign country. It allows me to do exactly what I want, when I want, but I also find myself searching for people to talk to and share with. I’ve met some beautiful people, new friends with huge experiences like Shannon, a woman from Canada working as a teacher in Pakistan and a Thai woman named Mai whose peaceful, uplifting energy I want to bottle up and emulate from now until forever. I’m learning a lot about myself through the people I meet, even if we only cross paths by sharing a short tuk-tuk ride or a smile on the street. And I hope my energy transfers in a positive way back to them, because I believe it cannot be by chance that we’re meeting at this time in this place.

- B

Catherine & Jon prepare to get serious for a photo during their engagement shoot at Dia:Beacon. This happened organically and it was just toooooo perfect not to GIF.

We’ve almost finished their edit, and we can’t wait to show them the full collection and post more to the blog. Their wedding was off-beat and beautiful and perfectly tailored to them as a couple. Catherine even had her hair stylist come in and cut her long hair off in the middle of the reception as a surprise.

!!!!!!!!!!!

Yea, you read that right. More fun to come!

Lina & James, Part I of IV

//


What is the big picture?

I ask myself and Bonnie this question at weddings. What is the picture that tells our couple’s greater story? — and not a story about what I think is the right “wedding” image? 


As progressive as I fancy myself regarding the modern wedding and the way it can be documented, I’m still sometimes trapped by the thought of what I “should” be shooting. (Should I shoot more pictures of the flowers? Did I get a good shot of the venue’s exterior?)


It’s the dilemma of ego. Both loathing and loving what I create, and deeply desiring to be accepted.



Last night in my dreams I walked up Adelphi Street naked. I felt uncomfortable, but I didn’t feel wrong. I overheard a passerby commenting incredulously “it’s understandable to be naked at night, but in the daytime?” 

What I know of Freud’s work — little — leads me to ask whether I perceive society (and myself) to accept vulnerability and honesty in certain situations while feeling like it will arbitrarily ostracize me in others. 

The best picture I make is in that magic moment when I accept my voice and make the picture the couple shows me. It’s right in front of me, and all I have to do is see it. I don’t have to complicate things by wondering how I can make it better or change it. Technical skill notwithstanding, accepting it as-is is the best picture.
And also the hardest picture to see.



Lina and James see the big picture.


Deeply rooted in the community of New York City and Chinatown, Lina, James and their families celebrated their wedding with profound consideration to family and the bonds of history.

Marrying at the City Clerk’s office with their entire family and closest friends (a group of 25), the whole group processed through the busy Chinatown streets to the family porcelain shop with an incredible grace. 

What is normally a bustling, unfamiliar, and thereby difficult place for me on any other day, the Lums and Huangs showed me their corner of New York City in a completely new way. I felt like I had traveled to a new country; and indeed, I had. The Chinatown community is culturally close-knit.  The difference this time was that we were with Lina and James, who guided and graciously welcomed us.

The family porcelain shop, Wing on Wo & Co, is on Mott Street, and has been in the family for generations. Lina told me that even though Wing is still a working commercial store, the shop has become more importantly a family home base. Walking through and past the main shop area, there’s a small hallway that leads to a hidden-away kitchen in the very back, with dozens of family pictures on the wall. Lina and her sister as children at the beach; a faded yellow image of the family laughing and squeezing each other in the shop in possibly the early 1980s; a black-and-white photo of Lina’s mom(?) on a city street when she was a child.

Lina and her sister have been going to the shop to visit with their grandparents since they were small children. When Lina told us at our first meeting that this was where she would take us all for pictures, we were floored. But honestly, not even the huge amount of excitement we already had could have prepared me for the beauty and sacredness I felt in that place.

Her grandparents have a dignity about them that surely comes from a steady love and preservation of the Chinatown community by way of nurturing this beautiful shop for so long.

Their roots in the city go deeper still. Lina’s uncle was a victim of the 9/11 attacks, working on the 111th floor of the second tower that was hit.


I believe Lina and James could have married anywhere and the only thing they would have seen is each other. I’m humbled by the new world I saw through them. There is so much beauty right in front of me.

—L
Lina & James, Part I of IV

//


What is the big picture?

I ask myself and Bonnie this question at weddings. What is the picture that tells our couple’s greater story? — and not a story about what I think is the right “wedding” image? 


As progressive as I fancy myself regarding the modern wedding and the way it can be documented, I’m still sometimes trapped by the thought of what I “should” be shooting. (Should I shoot more pictures of the flowers? Did I get a good shot of the venue’s exterior?)


It’s the dilemma of ego. Both loathing and loving what I create, and deeply desiring to be accepted.



Last night in my dreams I walked up Adelphi Street naked. I felt uncomfortable, but I didn’t feel wrong. I overheard a passerby commenting incredulously “it’s understandable to be naked at night, but in the daytime?” 

What I know of Freud’s work — little — leads me to ask whether I perceive society (and myself) to accept vulnerability and honesty in certain situations while feeling like it will arbitrarily ostracize me in others. 

The best picture I make is in that magic moment when I accept my voice and make the picture the couple shows me. It’s right in front of me, and all I have to do is see it. I don’t have to complicate things by wondering how I can make it better or change it. Technical skill notwithstanding, accepting it as-is is the best picture.
And also the hardest picture to see.



Lina and James see the big picture.


Deeply rooted in the community of New York City and Chinatown, Lina, James and their families celebrated their wedding with profound consideration to family and the bonds of history.

Marrying at the City Clerk’s office with their entire family and closest friends (a group of 25), the whole group processed through the busy Chinatown streets to the family porcelain shop with an incredible grace. 

What is normally a bustling, unfamiliar, and thereby difficult place for me on any other day, the Lums and Huangs showed me their corner of New York City in a completely new way. I felt like I had traveled to a new country; and indeed, I had. The Chinatown community is culturally close-knit.  The difference this time was that we were with Lina and James, who guided and graciously welcomed us.

The family porcelain shop, Wing on Wo & Co, is on Mott Street, and has been in the family for generations. Lina told me that even though Wing is still a working commercial store, the shop has become more importantly a family home base. Walking through and past the main shop area, there’s a small hallway that leads to a hidden-away kitchen in the very back, with dozens of family pictures on the wall. Lina and her sister as children at the beach; a faded yellow image of the family laughing and squeezing each other in the shop in possibly the early 1980s; a black-and-white photo of Lina’s mom(?) on a city street when she was a child.

Lina and her sister have been going to the shop to visit with their grandparents since they were small children. When Lina told us at our first meeting that this was where she would take us all for pictures, we were floored. But honestly, not even the huge amount of excitement we already had could have prepared me for the beauty and sacredness I felt in that place.

Her grandparents have a dignity about them that surely comes from a steady love and preservation of the Chinatown community by way of nurturing this beautiful shop for so long.

Their roots in the city go deeper still. Lina’s uncle was a victim of the 9/11 attacks, working on the 111th floor of the second tower that was hit.


I believe Lina and James could have married anywhere and the only thing they would have seen is each other. I’m humbled by the new world I saw through them. There is so much beauty right in front of me.

—L
Lina & James, Part I of IV

//


What is the big picture?

I ask myself and Bonnie this question at weddings. What is the picture that tells our couple’s greater story? — and not a story about what I think is the right “wedding” image? 


As progressive as I fancy myself regarding the modern wedding and the way it can be documented, I’m still sometimes trapped by the thought of what I “should” be shooting. (Should I shoot more pictures of the flowers? Did I get a good shot of the venue’s exterior?)


It’s the dilemma of ego. Both loathing and loving what I create, and deeply desiring to be accepted.



Last night in my dreams I walked up Adelphi Street naked. I felt uncomfortable, but I didn’t feel wrong. I overheard a passerby commenting incredulously “it’s understandable to be naked at night, but in the daytime?” 

What I know of Freud’s work — little — leads me to ask whether I perceive society (and myself) to accept vulnerability and honesty in certain situations while feeling like it will arbitrarily ostracize me in others. 

The best picture I make is in that magic moment when I accept my voice and make the picture the couple shows me. It’s right in front of me, and all I have to do is see it. I don’t have to complicate things by wondering how I can make it better or change it. Technical skill notwithstanding, accepting it as-is is the best picture.
And also the hardest picture to see.



Lina and James see the big picture.


Deeply rooted in the community of New York City and Chinatown, Lina, James and their families celebrated their wedding with profound consideration to family and the bonds of history.

Marrying at the City Clerk’s office with their entire family and closest friends (a group of 25), the whole group processed through the busy Chinatown streets to the family porcelain shop with an incredible grace. 

What is normally a bustling, unfamiliar, and thereby difficult place for me on any other day, the Lums and Huangs showed me their corner of New York City in a completely new way. I felt like I had traveled to a new country; and indeed, I had. The Chinatown community is culturally close-knit.  The difference this time was that we were with Lina and James, who guided and graciously welcomed us.

The family porcelain shop, Wing on Wo & Co, is on Mott Street, and has been in the family for generations. Lina told me that even though Wing is still a working commercial store, the shop has become more importantly a family home base. Walking through and past the main shop area, there’s a small hallway that leads to a hidden-away kitchen in the very back, with dozens of family pictures on the wall. Lina and her sister as children at the beach; a faded yellow image of the family laughing and squeezing each other in the shop in possibly the early 1980s; a black-and-white photo of Lina’s mom(?) on a city street when she was a child.

Lina and her sister have been going to the shop to visit with their grandparents since they were small children. When Lina told us at our first meeting that this was where she would take us all for pictures, we were floored. But honestly, not even the huge amount of excitement we already had could have prepared me for the beauty and sacredness I felt in that place.

Her grandparents have a dignity about them that surely comes from a steady love and preservation of the Chinatown community by way of nurturing this beautiful shop for so long.

Their roots in the city go deeper still. Lina’s uncle was a victim of the 9/11 attacks, working on the 111th floor of the second tower that was hit.


I believe Lina and James could have married anywhere and the only thing they would have seen is each other. I’m humbled by the new world I saw through them. There is so much beauty right in front of me.

—L
Lina & James, Part I of IV

//


What is the big picture?

I ask myself and Bonnie this question at weddings. What is the picture that tells our couple’s greater story? — and not a story about what I think is the right “wedding” image? 


As progressive as I fancy myself regarding the modern wedding and the way it can be documented, I’m still sometimes trapped by the thought of what I “should” be shooting. (Should I shoot more pictures of the flowers? Did I get a good shot of the venue’s exterior?)


It’s the dilemma of ego. Both loathing and loving what I create, and deeply desiring to be accepted.



Last night in my dreams I walked up Adelphi Street naked. I felt uncomfortable, but I didn’t feel wrong. I overheard a passerby commenting incredulously “it’s understandable to be naked at night, but in the daytime?” 

What I know of Freud’s work — little — leads me to ask whether I perceive society (and myself) to accept vulnerability and honesty in certain situations while feeling like it will arbitrarily ostracize me in others. 

The best picture I make is in that magic moment when I accept my voice and make the picture the couple shows me. It’s right in front of me, and all I have to do is see it. I don’t have to complicate things by wondering how I can make it better or change it. Technical skill notwithstanding, accepting it as-is is the best picture.
And also the hardest picture to see.



Lina and James see the big picture.


Deeply rooted in the community of New York City and Chinatown, Lina, James and their families celebrated their wedding with profound consideration to family and the bonds of history.

Marrying at the City Clerk’s office with their entire family and closest friends (a group of 25), the whole group processed through the busy Chinatown streets to the family porcelain shop with an incredible grace. 

What is normally a bustling, unfamiliar, and thereby difficult place for me on any other day, the Lums and Huangs showed me their corner of New York City in a completely new way. I felt like I had traveled to a new country; and indeed, I had. The Chinatown community is culturally close-knit.  The difference this time was that we were with Lina and James, who guided and graciously welcomed us.

The family porcelain shop, Wing on Wo & Co, is on Mott Street, and has been in the family for generations. Lina told me that even though Wing is still a working commercial store, the shop has become more importantly a family home base. Walking through and past the main shop area, there’s a small hallway that leads to a hidden-away kitchen in the very back, with dozens of family pictures on the wall. Lina and her sister as children at the beach; a faded yellow image of the family laughing and squeezing each other in the shop in possibly the early 1980s; a black-and-white photo of Lina’s mom(?) on a city street when she was a child.

Lina and her sister have been going to the shop to visit with their grandparents since they were small children. When Lina told us at our first meeting that this was where she would take us all for pictures, we were floored. But honestly, not even the huge amount of excitement we already had could have prepared me for the beauty and sacredness I felt in that place.

Her grandparents have a dignity about them that surely comes from a steady love and preservation of the Chinatown community by way of nurturing this beautiful shop for so long.

Their roots in the city go deeper still. Lina’s uncle was a victim of the 9/11 attacks, working on the 111th floor of the second tower that was hit.


I believe Lina and James could have married anywhere and the only thing they would have seen is each other. I’m humbled by the new world I saw through them. There is so much beauty right in front of me.

—L
Lina & James, Part I of IV

//


What is the big picture?

I ask myself and Bonnie this question at weddings. What is the picture that tells our couple’s greater story? — and not a story about what I think is the right “wedding” image? 


As progressive as I fancy myself regarding the modern wedding and the way it can be documented, I’m still sometimes trapped by the thought of what I “should” be shooting. (Should I shoot more pictures of the flowers? Did I get a good shot of the venue’s exterior?)


It’s the dilemma of ego. Both loathing and loving what I create, and deeply desiring to be accepted.



Last night in my dreams I walked up Adelphi Street naked. I felt uncomfortable, but I didn’t feel wrong. I overheard a passerby commenting incredulously “it’s understandable to be naked at night, but in the daytime?” 

What I know of Freud’s work — little — leads me to ask whether I perceive society (and myself) to accept vulnerability and honesty in certain situations while feeling like it will arbitrarily ostracize me in others. 

The best picture I make is in that magic moment when I accept my voice and make the picture the couple shows me. It’s right in front of me, and all I have to do is see it. I don’t have to complicate things by wondering how I can make it better or change it. Technical skill notwithstanding, accepting it as-is is the best picture.
And also the hardest picture to see.



Lina and James see the big picture.


Deeply rooted in the community of New York City and Chinatown, Lina, James and their families celebrated their wedding with profound consideration to family and the bonds of history.

Marrying at the City Clerk’s office with their entire family and closest friends (a group of 25), the whole group processed through the busy Chinatown streets to the family porcelain shop with an incredible grace. 

What is normally a bustling, unfamiliar, and thereby difficult place for me on any other day, the Lums and Huangs showed me their corner of New York City in a completely new way. I felt like I had traveled to a new country; and indeed, I had. The Chinatown community is culturally close-knit.  The difference this time was that we were with Lina and James, who guided and graciously welcomed us.

The family porcelain shop, Wing on Wo & Co, is on Mott Street, and has been in the family for generations. Lina told me that even though Wing is still a working commercial store, the shop has become more importantly a family home base. Walking through and past the main shop area, there’s a small hallway that leads to a hidden-away kitchen in the very back, with dozens of family pictures on the wall. Lina and her sister as children at the beach; a faded yellow image of the family laughing and squeezing each other in the shop in possibly the early 1980s; a black-and-white photo of Lina’s mom(?) on a city street when she was a child.

Lina and her sister have been going to the shop to visit with their grandparents since they were small children. When Lina told us at our first meeting that this was where she would take us all for pictures, we were floored. But honestly, not even the huge amount of excitement we already had could have prepared me for the beauty and sacredness I felt in that place.

Her grandparents have a dignity about them that surely comes from a steady love and preservation of the Chinatown community by way of nurturing this beautiful shop for so long.

Their roots in the city go deeper still. Lina’s uncle was a victim of the 9/11 attacks, working on the 111th floor of the second tower that was hit.


I believe Lina and James could have married anywhere and the only thing they would have seen is each other. I’m humbled by the new world I saw through them. There is so much beauty right in front of me.

—L
Lina & James, Part I of IV

//


What is the big picture?

I ask myself and Bonnie this question at weddings. What is the picture that tells our couple’s greater story? — and not a story about what I think is the right “wedding” image? 


As progressive as I fancy myself regarding the modern wedding and the way it can be documented, I’m still sometimes trapped by the thought of what I “should” be shooting. (Should I shoot more pictures of the flowers? Did I get a good shot of the venue’s exterior?)


It’s the dilemma of ego. Both loathing and loving what I create, and deeply desiring to be accepted.



Last night in my dreams I walked up Adelphi Street naked. I felt uncomfortable, but I didn’t feel wrong. I overheard a passerby commenting incredulously “it’s understandable to be naked at night, but in the daytime?” 

What I know of Freud’s work — little — leads me to ask whether I perceive society (and myself) to accept vulnerability and honesty in certain situations while feeling like it will arbitrarily ostracize me in others. 

The best picture I make is in that magic moment when I accept my voice and make the picture the couple shows me. It’s right in front of me, and all I have to do is see it. I don’t have to complicate things by wondering how I can make it better or change it. Technical skill notwithstanding, accepting it as-is is the best picture.
And also the hardest picture to see.



Lina and James see the big picture.


Deeply rooted in the community of New York City and Chinatown, Lina, James and their families celebrated their wedding with profound consideration to family and the bonds of history.

Marrying at the City Clerk’s office with their entire family and closest friends (a group of 25), the whole group processed through the busy Chinatown streets to the family porcelain shop with an incredible grace. 

What is normally a bustling, unfamiliar, and thereby difficult place for me on any other day, the Lums and Huangs showed me their corner of New York City in a completely new way. I felt like I had traveled to a new country; and indeed, I had. The Chinatown community is culturally close-knit.  The difference this time was that we were with Lina and James, who guided and graciously welcomed us.

The family porcelain shop, Wing on Wo & Co, is on Mott Street, and has been in the family for generations. Lina told me that even though Wing is still a working commercial store, the shop has become more importantly a family home base. Walking through and past the main shop area, there’s a small hallway that leads to a hidden-away kitchen in the very back, with dozens of family pictures on the wall. Lina and her sister as children at the beach; a faded yellow image of the family laughing and squeezing each other in the shop in possibly the early 1980s; a black-and-white photo of Lina’s mom(?) on a city street when she was a child.

Lina and her sister have been going to the shop to visit with their grandparents since they were small children. When Lina told us at our first meeting that this was where she would take us all for pictures, we were floored. But honestly, not even the huge amount of excitement we already had could have prepared me for the beauty and sacredness I felt in that place.

Her grandparents have a dignity about them that surely comes from a steady love and preservation of the Chinatown community by way of nurturing this beautiful shop for so long.

Their roots in the city go deeper still. Lina’s uncle was a victim of the 9/11 attacks, working on the 111th floor of the second tower that was hit.


I believe Lina and James could have married anywhere and the only thing they would have seen is each other. I’m humbled by the new world I saw through them. There is so much beauty right in front of me.

—L
Lina & James, Part I of IV

//


What is the big picture?

I ask myself and Bonnie this question at weddings. What is the picture that tells our couple’s greater story? — and not a story about what I think is the right “wedding” image? 


As progressive as I fancy myself regarding the modern wedding and the way it can be documented, I’m still sometimes trapped by the thought of what I “should” be shooting. (Should I shoot more pictures of the flowers? Did I get a good shot of the venue’s exterior?)


It’s the dilemma of ego. Both loathing and loving what I create, and deeply desiring to be accepted.



Last night in my dreams I walked up Adelphi Street naked. I felt uncomfortable, but I didn’t feel wrong. I overheard a passerby commenting incredulously “it’s understandable to be naked at night, but in the daytime?” 

What I know of Freud’s work — little — leads me to ask whether I perceive society (and myself) to accept vulnerability and honesty in certain situations while feeling like it will arbitrarily ostracize me in others. 

The best picture I make is in that magic moment when I accept my voice and make the picture the couple shows me. It’s right in front of me, and all I have to do is see it. I don’t have to complicate things by wondering how I can make it better or change it. Technical skill notwithstanding, accepting it as-is is the best picture.
And also the hardest picture to see.



Lina and James see the big picture.


Deeply rooted in the community of New York City and Chinatown, Lina, James and their families celebrated their wedding with profound consideration to family and the bonds of history.

Marrying at the City Clerk’s office with their entire family and closest friends (a group of 25), the whole group processed through the busy Chinatown streets to the family porcelain shop with an incredible grace. 

What is normally a bustling, unfamiliar, and thereby difficult place for me on any other day, the Lums and Huangs showed me their corner of New York City in a completely new way. I felt like I had traveled to a new country; and indeed, I had. The Chinatown community is culturally close-knit.  The difference this time was that we were with Lina and James, who guided and graciously welcomed us.

The family porcelain shop, Wing on Wo & Co, is on Mott Street, and has been in the family for generations. Lina told me that even though Wing is still a working commercial store, the shop has become more importantly a family home base. Walking through and past the main shop area, there’s a small hallway that leads to a hidden-away kitchen in the very back, with dozens of family pictures on the wall. Lina and her sister as children at the beach; a faded yellow image of the family laughing and squeezing each other in the shop in possibly the early 1980s; a black-and-white photo of Lina’s mom(?) on a city street when she was a child.

Lina and her sister have been going to the shop to visit with their grandparents since they were small children. When Lina told us at our first meeting that this was where she would take us all for pictures, we were floored. But honestly, not even the huge amount of excitement we already had could have prepared me for the beauty and sacredness I felt in that place.

Her grandparents have a dignity about them that surely comes from a steady love and preservation of the Chinatown community by way of nurturing this beautiful shop for so long.

Their roots in the city go deeper still. Lina’s uncle was a victim of the 9/11 attacks, working on the 111th floor of the second tower that was hit.


I believe Lina and James could have married anywhere and the only thing they would have seen is each other. I’m humbled by the new world I saw through them. There is so much beauty right in front of me.

—L
Lina & James, Part I of IV

//


What is the big picture?

I ask myself and Bonnie this question at weddings. What is the picture that tells our couple’s greater story? — and not a story about what I think is the right “wedding” image? 


As progressive as I fancy myself regarding the modern wedding and the way it can be documented, I’m still sometimes trapped by the thought of what I “should” be shooting. (Should I shoot more pictures of the flowers? Did I get a good shot of the venue’s exterior?)


It’s the dilemma of ego. Both loathing and loving what I create, and deeply desiring to be accepted.



Last night in my dreams I walked up Adelphi Street naked. I felt uncomfortable, but I didn’t feel wrong. I overheard a passerby commenting incredulously “it’s understandable to be naked at night, but in the daytime?” 

What I know of Freud’s work — little — leads me to ask whether I perceive society (and myself) to accept vulnerability and honesty in certain situations while feeling like it will arbitrarily ostracize me in others. 

The best picture I make is in that magic moment when I accept my voice and make the picture the couple shows me. It’s right in front of me, and all I have to do is see it. I don’t have to complicate things by wondering how I can make it better or change it. Technical skill notwithstanding, accepting it as-is is the best picture.
And also the hardest picture to see.



Lina and James see the big picture.


Deeply rooted in the community of New York City and Chinatown, Lina, James and their families celebrated their wedding with profound consideration to family and the bonds of history.

Marrying at the City Clerk’s office with their entire family and closest friends (a group of 25), the whole group processed through the busy Chinatown streets to the family porcelain shop with an incredible grace. 

What is normally a bustling, unfamiliar, and thereby difficult place for me on any other day, the Lums and Huangs showed me their corner of New York City in a completely new way. I felt like I had traveled to a new country; and indeed, I had. The Chinatown community is culturally close-knit.  The difference this time was that we were with Lina and James, who guided and graciously welcomed us.

The family porcelain shop, Wing on Wo & Co, is on Mott Street, and has been in the family for generations. Lina told me that even though Wing is still a working commercial store, the shop has become more importantly a family home base. Walking through and past the main shop area, there’s a small hallway that leads to a hidden-away kitchen in the very back, with dozens of family pictures on the wall. Lina and her sister as children at the beach; a faded yellow image of the family laughing and squeezing each other in the shop in possibly the early 1980s; a black-and-white photo of Lina’s mom(?) on a city street when she was a child.

Lina and her sister have been going to the shop to visit with their grandparents since they were small children. When Lina told us at our first meeting that this was where she would take us all for pictures, we were floored. But honestly, not even the huge amount of excitement we already had could have prepared me for the beauty and sacredness I felt in that place.

Her grandparents have a dignity about them that surely comes from a steady love and preservation of the Chinatown community by way of nurturing this beautiful shop for so long.

Their roots in the city go deeper still. Lina’s uncle was a victim of the 9/11 attacks, working on the 111th floor of the second tower that was hit.


I believe Lina and James could have married anywhere and the only thing they would have seen is each other. I’m humbled by the new world I saw through them. There is so much beauty right in front of me.

—L
Lina & James, Part I of IV

//


What is the big picture?

I ask myself and Bonnie this question at weddings. What is the picture that tells our couple’s greater story? — and not a story about what I think is the right “wedding” image? 


As progressive as I fancy myself regarding the modern wedding and the way it can be documented, I’m still sometimes trapped by the thought of what I “should” be shooting. (Should I shoot more pictures of the flowers? Did I get a good shot of the venue’s exterior?)


It’s the dilemma of ego. Both loathing and loving what I create, and deeply desiring to be accepted.



Last night in my dreams I walked up Adelphi Street naked. I felt uncomfortable, but I didn’t feel wrong. I overheard a passerby commenting incredulously “it’s understandable to be naked at night, but in the daytime?” 

What I know of Freud’s work — little — leads me to ask whether I perceive society (and myself) to accept vulnerability and honesty in certain situations while feeling like it will arbitrarily ostracize me in others. 

The best picture I make is in that magic moment when I accept my voice and make the picture the couple shows me. It’s right in front of me, and all I have to do is see it. I don’t have to complicate things by wondering how I can make it better or change it. Technical skill notwithstanding, accepting it as-is is the best picture.
And also the hardest picture to see.



Lina and James see the big picture.


Deeply rooted in the community of New York City and Chinatown, Lina, James and their families celebrated their wedding with profound consideration to family and the bonds of history.

Marrying at the City Clerk’s office with their entire family and closest friends (a group of 25), the whole group processed through the busy Chinatown streets to the family porcelain shop with an incredible grace. 

What is normally a bustling, unfamiliar, and thereby difficult place for me on any other day, the Lums and Huangs showed me their corner of New York City in a completely new way. I felt like I had traveled to a new country; and indeed, I had. The Chinatown community is culturally close-knit.  The difference this time was that we were with Lina and James, who guided and graciously welcomed us.

The family porcelain shop, Wing on Wo & Co, is on Mott Street, and has been in the family for generations. Lina told me that even though Wing is still a working commercial store, the shop has become more importantly a family home base. Walking through and past the main shop area, there’s a small hallway that leads to a hidden-away kitchen in the very back, with dozens of family pictures on the wall. Lina and her sister as children at the beach; a faded yellow image of the family laughing and squeezing each other in the shop in possibly the early 1980s; a black-and-white photo of Lina’s mom(?) on a city street when she was a child.

Lina and her sister have been going to the shop to visit with their grandparents since they were small children. When Lina told us at our first meeting that this was where she would take us all for pictures, we were floored. But honestly, not even the huge amount of excitement we already had could have prepared me for the beauty and sacredness I felt in that place.

Her grandparents have a dignity about them that surely comes from a steady love and preservation of the Chinatown community by way of nurturing this beautiful shop for so long.

Their roots in the city go deeper still. Lina’s uncle was a victim of the 9/11 attacks, working on the 111th floor of the second tower that was hit.


I believe Lina and James could have married anywhere and the only thing they would have seen is each other. I’m humbled by the new world I saw through them. There is so much beauty right in front of me.

—L
Lina & James, Part I of IV

//


What is the big picture?

I ask myself and Bonnie this question at weddings. What is the picture that tells our couple’s greater story? — and not a story about what I think is the right “wedding” image? 


As progressive as I fancy myself regarding the modern wedding and the way it can be documented, I’m still sometimes trapped by the thought of what I “should” be shooting. (Should I shoot more pictures of the flowers? Did I get a good shot of the venue’s exterior?)


It’s the dilemma of ego. Both loathing and loving what I create, and deeply desiring to be accepted.



Last night in my dreams I walked up Adelphi Street naked. I felt uncomfortable, but I didn’t feel wrong. I overheard a passerby commenting incredulously “it’s understandable to be naked at night, but in the daytime?” 

What I know of Freud’s work — little — leads me to ask whether I perceive society (and myself) to accept vulnerability and honesty in certain situations while feeling like it will arbitrarily ostracize me in others. 

The best picture I make is in that magic moment when I accept my voice and make the picture the couple shows me. It’s right in front of me, and all I have to do is see it. I don’t have to complicate things by wondering how I can make it better or change it. Technical skill notwithstanding, accepting it as-is is the best picture.
And also the hardest picture to see.



Lina and James see the big picture.


Deeply rooted in the community of New York City and Chinatown, Lina, James and their families celebrated their wedding with profound consideration to family and the bonds of history.

Marrying at the City Clerk’s office with their entire family and closest friends (a group of 25), the whole group processed through the busy Chinatown streets to the family porcelain shop with an incredible grace. 

What is normally a bustling, unfamiliar, and thereby difficult place for me on any other day, the Lums and Huangs showed me their corner of New York City in a completely new way. I felt like I had traveled to a new country; and indeed, I had. The Chinatown community is culturally close-knit.  The difference this time was that we were with Lina and James, who guided and graciously welcomed us.

The family porcelain shop, Wing on Wo & Co, is on Mott Street, and has been in the family for generations. Lina told me that even though Wing is still a working commercial store, the shop has become more importantly a family home base. Walking through and past the main shop area, there’s a small hallway that leads to a hidden-away kitchen in the very back, with dozens of family pictures on the wall. Lina and her sister as children at the beach; a faded yellow image of the family laughing and squeezing each other in the shop in possibly the early 1980s; a black-and-white photo of Lina’s mom(?) on a city street when she was a child.

Lina and her sister have been going to the shop to visit with their grandparents since they were small children. When Lina told us at our first meeting that this was where she would take us all for pictures, we were floored. But honestly, not even the huge amount of excitement we already had could have prepared me for the beauty and sacredness I felt in that place.

Her grandparents have a dignity about them that surely comes from a steady love and preservation of the Chinatown community by way of nurturing this beautiful shop for so long.

Their roots in the city go deeper still. Lina’s uncle was a victim of the 9/11 attacks, working on the 111th floor of the second tower that was hit.


I believe Lina and James could have married anywhere and the only thing they would have seen is each other. I’m humbled by the new world I saw through them. There is so much beauty right in front of me.

—L
Lina & James, Part I of IV
//

What is the big picture?

I ask myself and Bonnie this question at weddings. What is the picture that tells our couple’s greater story? — and not a story about what I think is the right “wedding” image? 

As progressive as I fancy myself regarding the modern wedding and the way it can be documented, I’m still sometimes trapped by the thought of what I “should” be shooting. (Should I shoot more pictures of the flowers? Did I get a good shot of the venue’s exterior?)

It’s the dilemma of ego. Both loathing and loving what I create, and deeply desiring to be accepted.

Last night in my dreams I walked up Adelphi Street naked. I felt uncomfortable, but I didn’t feel wrong. I overheard a passerby commenting incredulously “it’s understandable to be naked at night, but in the daytime?” 

What I know of Freud’s work — little — leads me to ask whether I perceive society (and myself) to accept vulnerability and honesty in certain situations while feeling like it will arbitrarily ostracize me in others. 

The best picture I make is in that magic moment when I accept my voice and make the picture the couple shows me. It’s right in front of me, and all I have to do is see it. I don’t have to complicate things by wondering how I can make it better or change it. Technical skill notwithstanding, accepting it as-is is the best picture.

And also the hardest picture to see.



Lina and James see the big picture.

Deeply rooted in the community of New York City and Chinatown, Lina, James and their families celebrated their wedding with profound consideration to family and the bonds of history.

Marrying at the City Clerk’s office with their entire family and closest friends (a group of 25), the whole group processed through the busy Chinatown streets to the family porcelain shop with an incredible grace. 

What is normally a bustling, unfamiliar, and thereby difficult place for me on any other day, the Lums and Huangs showed me their corner of New York City in a completely new way. I felt like I had traveled to a new country; and indeed, I had. The Chinatown community is culturally close-knit.  The difference this time was that we were with Lina and James, who guided and graciously welcomed us.

The family porcelain shop, Wing on Wo & Co, is on Mott Street, and has been in the family for generations. Lina told me that even though Wing is still a working commercial store, the shop has become more importantly a family home base. Walking through and past the main shop area, there’s a small hallway that leads to a hidden-away kitchen in the very back, with dozens of family pictures on the wall. Lina and her sister as children at the beach; a faded yellow image of the family laughing and squeezing each other in the shop in possibly the early 1980s; a black-and-white photo of Lina’s mom(?) on a city street when she was a child.

Lina and her sister have been going to the shop to visit with their grandparents since they were small children. When Lina told us at our first meeting that this was where she would take us all for pictures, we were floored. But honestly, not even the huge amount of excitement we already had could have prepared me for the beauty and sacredness I felt in that place.

Her grandparents have a dignity about them that surely comes from a steady love and preservation of the Chinatown community by way of nurturing this beautiful shop for so long.

Their roots in the city go deeper still. Lina’s uncle was a victim of the 9/11 attacks, working on the 111th floor of the second tower that was hit.

I believe Lina and James could have married anywhere and the only thing they would have seen is each other. I’m humbled by the new world I saw through them. There is so much beauty right in front of me.
—L